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October 4-6 in Berlin, Germany
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Tuesday, October 4
 

11:15

Firefighting Linux Kernel Regressions - Thorsten Leemhuis, Heise Medien GmbH
Learn how to improve Linux by testing new kernels and fighting regressions. Both is easy and in your own interest, as the kernel (which is at the heart of any Linux system) constantly changes. Those changes sometimes break things that used to work; in other cases the performance suffers. These regressions are annoying, but can be fixed easily – however only when noticed and investigated early enough, as it gets way harder to revert a change once it makes it into a new kernel release.

This talk and its live demo will show you how to quickly test upcoming kernel releases without messing up your system. It will also explain how to report problems in case you find any. While covering those areas Thorsten will share some insights he learned while tracking regressions for the Linux kernel versions 4.7 and 4.8.

Speakers
avatar for Thorsten Leemhuis

Thorsten Leemhuis

Editor, c't/Heise Medien
Thorsten works as an editor for Heise Medien, which publishes the German c't magazine and runs the tech news site heise.de. For both he writes a column called "Kernel Log", which regularly discusses developments in the Linux kernel and areas close to it. Thorsten also was a major... Read More →


Tuesday October 4, 2016 11:15 - 12:05
Charlottenburg III

11:15

Geo-Replication and Disaster Recovery for Cloud Object Storage with Ceph Rados Gateway - Orit Wasserman, Red Hat
Ceph is a highly available distributed software defined storage, providing object, key/value and file-system interfaces. Ceph RGW (Rados Gateway) provides HTTP REST API that is S3 and openstack swift compatible.
Many users need storage systems that can span multiple data centers and geographies for disaster recovery and for better time response in remote locations.
This talk will give a brief Ceph architecture overview and then focus on the design and the new implementation of asynchronous Geo-Replication and disaster recovery features in Ceph Rados Gateway. We will also describe its configuration and usage.

Speakers
avatar for Orit Wasserman

Orit Wasserman

Senior Principal Software Engineer, Red Hat
Orit is a senior principal software engineer at Red Hat, focusing on Container and multi cloud storage. She was a principal architect at Lightbits labs working on NVMe/TCP software-defined storage. At Red Hat, she worked on Ceph object storage (Ceph Rados Gateway), a highly available... Read More →


Tuesday October 4, 2016 11:15 - 12:05
Köpenick

11:15

OpenSSL After Heartbleed - Rich Salz & Tim Hudson, OpenSSL
OpenSSL is the most widely-deployed TLS library in the world. A simple programming mistake—failing to check an output length—shook up the project and generated a “re-key the Internet” event. This session will discuss what has happened within the project since then: an expanded team, increased transparency, more rigorous development processes, and greatly increased vitality.

Speakers
avatar for Tim Hudson

Tim Hudson

Dev Team, OpenSSL
Tim Hudson has been involved in system security for more than 20 years. Tim's day job is as the CTO at Cryptsoft where he provides advice and guidance on security technology design and architecture. Tim is involved in KMIP, PKCS#11, FIPS140, OASIS and SNIA and is a long time OpenSSL... Read More →
RS

Rich Salz

Dev Team, OpenSSL
Rich has spoken at RSA, Java-One, and LF Collab Summit, among others. He works at Akamai, helping to make the configuration simpler and more secure by default. He is a member of the OpenSSL development team. He co-chairs the IETF ACME (LetsEncrypt protocol) and Curdle (new ECC curve... Read More →


Tuesday October 4, 2016 11:15 - 12:05
Potsdam I/II

11:15

Why You Hate Security, and What You Can do About It - Casey Schaufler, The Smack Project
Why you hate security, and what you can do about it (Casey Schaufler, Intel) - Regardless of the level at which you're doing your programming, security is going to get in the way. No amount of application abstraction or modern development process seems capable of shielding you from the barriers raised by security.
Let a deep security insider guide you through the reasons we have the security that drives you nuts. Then, with the aid of real world examples, you'll learn how to identify situations where security mechanisms are unnecessary, and the jargon needed to explain this to the people who insist on using them. There are lots of ways to make your life easier beyond turning off SELinux. The things that a developer can do up front to reduce exposure to security mechanisms will be explored. Finally, the issues around security and development process will be exposed.

Speakers
avatar for Casey Schaufler

Casey Schaufler

Engineer, Intel
Casey Schaufler worked on Unix kernels in the 1970s-90s. He has implemented access control lists, mandatory access control, extended filesystem attributes, X11 access controls, network protocols and audit systems. His involvement in Linux began with the Linux Security Module work... Read More →


Tuesday October 4, 2016 11:15 - 12:05
Potsdam III

11:15

Making More Open: Creating Open Source Infrastructure for Your Open Source Project - Amye Scavarda & Nigel Babu, Red Hat

A community lead and a continuous integration architect walk into a room and argue about the best practices around developing your infrastructure to support your growth as an open source project.

Items of conversation will include:
* Config management should be path to contribution
* What is access control anyways?
* Why not to give root out like candy
* Discovery for legacy systems
* Internal stakeholder compromises
* Iteration in the open
* What happens when everything is broken?

While we'll be using GlusterFS as our model, this is a conversation about best and worst practices and their application.

Speakers
AS

Amye Scavarda

Gluster Community Lead, Red Hat
Gluster Community Lead at Red Hat


Tuesday October 4, 2016 11:15 - 12:05
Tiergarten
  • Experience Level Any

11:15

Tuning Linux to Get the Best Performance from Varnish Cache - Per Buer, Varnish Software
Varnish Cache is used by 2.2 million websites including Pinterest, Vimeo and Tesla to cache web content, maximize web performance and reduce origin-server load. People often want to know how they can squeeze more performance from their Varnish Cache infrastructures. In most cases, the Linux configuration needs some fine tuning as its default configuration is not optimised for a high web performance web server like Varnish Cache.
Googling for tuning advice about Linux when it comes to Varnish Cache does not always yield helpful advice. Much of what comes back is either outdated or not quite right and the tuning advice could have a detrimental effect of your site’s availability.
This practical session aimed at sysadmins will explain how to tune both: your Varnish Cache and Linux. It will run through all Linux’s default values that need to be changed to achieve high web performance..

Speakers
PB

Per Buer

Varnish Software
Per Buer is the CTO and Founder of Varnish Software, the company behind Varnish Cache. He has nearly twenty years experience building and managing web-related solutions from infrastructure to web applications and in roles ranging from programmer to CEO. Per started his career with... Read More →


Tuesday October 4, 2016 11:15 - 12:05
Hugos South

12:15

Ceph and Flash - Allen Samuels, Western Digital
Ceph is the leading open-source storage management platform for private cloud and large-scale clustered systems. As flash-based storage has come into the mainstream many of the industry best-practices must be re-examined to properly realize the full value of flash while simultaneously being cost-effective.

Ceph has been rapidly evolving to support large-scale deployment of flash. This presentation will examine the history and current best-practices for deploying flash with Ceph. Future developments in the Ceph platform will also be described and their impact on flash deployments.

Speakers
avatar for Allen Samuels

Allen Samuels

Engineering Fellow, Western Digital
Allen joined SanDisk in 2013 as an Engineering Fellow, he is responsible for directing software development for SanDisk’s system level products. He has previously served as Chief Architect at Weitek Corp. and Citrix, and founded several companies including AMKAR Consulting, Orbital... Read More →


Tuesday October 4, 2016 12:15 - 13:05
Potsdam I/II

12:15

Deploying pNFS over Distributed File Storage - Jiffin Tony Thottan & Niels de Vos, Red Hat
pNFS is the clustered solution provided by standard NFS protocol which allow NFS clients to access directly and parallelly the Storage device. This is achieved by the separation of metadata from the datapath. Therefore pNFS solution provides better bandwidth utilization, loading balancing across storage devices and significant performance improvement for I/O's. Now consider applying the pNFS over a Distributed Storage instead of native NFS. Here instead of talking to single server, pNFS client can interact directly with all the Storage Servers , i.e I/O distribution become much more effective and also avoids performance bottleneck with in a single server. In this session, Jiffin Tony Thottan is planning to give an overview about pNFS, deploying simple pNFS solution on a Distribute File Storage by taking example of glusterfs + NFS-ganesha and challenges involved in while doing so.

Speakers
JT

Jiffin Tony Thottan

Senior Software Engineer, Red Hat
Jiffin Tony Thottan completed the graduation in 2014 and started the career as an intern in Red Hat. Currently working as Senior Software Engineer in Red Hat Storage Team and actively contributing to communities such as Gluster, NFS-Ganesha and Rook. His expertise includes Storage... Read More →
avatar for Niels de Vos

Niels de Vos

Senior Software Engineer, Red Hat
Niels is a core-developer and maintainer for Gluster. He is employed by Red Hat and works together with other teams who provide professional support for Red Hat Gluster Storage. The main areas where Niels is active include network protocols, low-level/Operating Systems improvements... Read More →


Tuesday October 4, 2016 12:15 - 13:05
Köpenick
  • Experience Level Any

12:15

Kernel Documentation: What We Have and How We'll Make it Better - Jonathan Corbet, LWN.net
It is often said that kernel developers don't care about documentation, but the truth can be seen in the kernel repository: thousands of documentation files and tens of thousands of kernel-doc comments. The problem is that it's all a bit ... messy. Your speaker, in the role of the kernel's documentation maintainer, is trying to clean things up a bit. The talk will cover the current state of kernel documentation, what's being done to make it better, and, along the way, some of the interesting challenges that come with being a kernel subsystem maintainer in general.

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Corbet

Jonathan Corbet

Executive Editor, LWN.net


Tuesday October 4, 2016 12:15 - 13:05
Charlottenburg III

12:15

Solving the Paradox: Less Downtime - More Security - Hannes Kühnemund, SUSE
Minimizing downtime is at the heart of every IT manager because end users are more satisfied if their work isn't blocked by an system outage. However, downtime is unaviodable if a mandatory system updates must be applied in order to fix a critical security hole. But what if there is a technology that can solve this paradox by updating the system without downtime? The upstream project "livepatch", fed with the best from the distributor specific implementations kGraft from SUSE and kpatch from Red Hat, is about to make that happen for the Linux Kernel itself - the core component of every system, where patching would always require a reboot. In this presentation, Hannes Kühnemund will talk about recent developments, discuss the current state including a deep dive into challenges on the way.

Speakers
avatar for Hannes Kühnemund

Hannes Kühnemund

Sr. Product Manager, SUSE
As part of the global Product Management unit at SUSE, Hannes Kühnemund carries responsibility for two major SUSE products: SLE Live Patching and SLES for SAP Applications. Prior to joining SUSE, Kühnemund was with SAP for 14 years in different roles, such as Product Owner, Project... Read More →


Tuesday October 4, 2016 12:15 - 13:05
Potsdam III

12:15

If You Build It, They Won't Come - Ruth Suehle, Red Hat
Good code isn't enough for a successful open source project. First of all, only you know how to use what you've made. Maybe it's time for a little UI and UX help? At the very least some documentation! Next, how is anyone else going to find what you've created? And that's only the beginning. Ruth Suehle, manager of Red Hat's Open Source and Standards community leadership team, will take you through examples of the best and the worst, from projects large and small, to help you see what you need beyond your code to build a successful open source project and community.

Speakers
avatar for Ruth Suehle

Ruth Suehle

Senior Manager, Community Outreach, Red Hat
Ruth Suehle is Senior Manager of Community Outreach in Red Hat’s Open Source Program Office, which supports software communities and their projects. Co-author of Raspberry Pi Hacks (O’Reilly, December 2013) and previously editor of Red Hat Magazine and opensource.com, Ruth is... Read More →


Tuesday October 4, 2016 12:15 - 13:05
Tiergarten

14:30

21st Century DNSBLs - Amanda Folson, GitLab
Spammers have been using computers to send unsolicited messages since 1978. However, the first DNS-based blacklist (DNSBL) wasn't created until 1997 -- almost 20 years later. Since then, the practice of spamming has grown at an alarming rate. The mechanics of creating and
managing a DNSBL haven't changed all that much, but the tooling around them has changed drastically. In this talk, we'll discuss how to create a DNSBL, what tools are available to do so, and how to manage the DNSBL once it's set up. Additionally, we'll discuss how to easily migrate and scale a legacy DNSBL system using Docker.

Speakers
AF

Amanda Folson

From humble beginnings as a PHP4 web developer in grade school, Amanda now works as a Developer Advocate at GitLab where she gets to share her passion for technology with others. When she's not speaking, writing, or shooing cats off her keyboard, you'll find her consuming APIs and... Read More →


Tuesday October 4, 2016 14:30 - 15:20
Potsdam III

14:30

Panel Discussion: Outreachy Kernel Internship Report - Moderated by Julia Lawall, Inria
Come learn about the great work our kernel interns have accomplished! Outreachy provides a 3-month paid internship for women, trans men, genderqueer people, and US members of other underrepresented groups to work on an open source project. The panel will present the program and this year's Linux kernel projects. Shraddha Barke will present her work on cleaning up staging driver code. Ioana Ciornei will present her work on improving the efficiency of the Ceph distributed filesystem. Cristina Moraru will present her work on getting the HMC5843 3-axis Digital Compass driver out of staging, and on developing the TH06 and MAX5487 IIO drivers. Ksenija Stanojević will present her work on reorganizing the mxs-lradc staging driver. Janani Ravichandran will present her work on memory allocation latency tracing. Finally, Daniel Baluta will be available to present a mentor's perspective.

Moderators
avatar for Julia Lawall

Julia Lawall

Senior Researcher, Inria
Julia Lawall is a Senior Research Scientist at Inria. Her research is at the intersection of programming languages and operating systems. She develops the tool Coccinelle and has over 2000 patches in the Linux kernel based on this work.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Baluta

Daniel Baluta

Linux Kernel Engineer at NXP, NXP
Daniel works at NXP in Romania hacking on Linux kernel audio drivers for i.MX boards. He is a teaching assistant for Operating System Internals class at University POLITEHNICA in Bucharest and very passionate about helping newcomers to the Linux kernel world while being a mentor for... Read More →
SB

Shraddha Barke

Student, BITS Pilani
JR

Janani Ravichandran

Student, University at Buffalo


Tuesday October 4, 2016 14:30 - 15:20
Tiergarten
  • Experience Level Any

14:30

PM Infrastructure in the Linux Kernel - Current Status and Future - Rafael J. Wysocki, Intel OTC
Multiple subsystems in the Linux kernel are concerned with various aspects of energy efficiency. Some of them act on the system as a whole while the others focus on individual CPUs or IO devices. The majority of them have been developed in isolation and they work reasonably well individually, but that is often insufficient to address problems related to contemporary trends in hardware design and growing user expectations. Thus they have to be made work more closely with one another and with core kernel code like the CPU scheduler. Efforts to make that happen are under way and I will describe them. However, in the meantime the existing Linux PM infrastructure has to respond to the users' needs, so I will discuss its current status, the most important problems it is facing and some possible ways to address them.

Speakers
avatar for Rafael J. Wysocki

Rafael J. Wysocki

Software Engineer, Intel OTC
Rafael maintains the Linux kernel's core ACPI and power management code, including the core infrastructure for IO device PM, CPU PM and system suspend/hibernation. He works at Intel Open Source Technology Center as a Software Engineer focusing on the mainline Linux kernel. Rafael... Read More →


Tuesday October 4, 2016 14:30 - 15:20
Charlottenburg III

14:30

Ceph Community Update - Lars Marowsky-Brée, SUSE
The Ceph project is the most vibrant and active Software-Defined-Storage project in the Linux world. With the recent "Jewel" release, significant functionality, stability, and performance work has been made available. By the time of LinuxCon Europe, we will already be close to the "Kraken" release, in preparation for the next long-term release "Luminous" in 2017. There is plenty of exciting work in the management tooling space, from GUIs to configuration management, and downstream activity and distribution adoption. Some of the features promise significant performance gains, or major new functionality like CephFS.

We will discuss the recent developments, current status of various features, and the roadmap of the Ceph project. We will also look at the state of the community and contributions.

Speakers
avatar for Lars Marowsky-Brée

Lars Marowsky-Brée

Depressed Engineer, SUSE
Lars is the architect for Software-Defined-Storage at SUSE, and represents SUSE on the Ceph Foundation Board of Governors. He lives in Berlin.


Tuesday October 4, 2016 14:30 - 15:20
Köpenick

14:30

Explain Yourself! Documentation for Better Code - Chris Ward, Crate.IO
Explain Yourself! Documentation for Better Code (Chris Ward) - How many times have you come across an awesome looking library or tool that you're keen to work with in your own project but can't even begin to understand how to use it?

Programmers are great at creating amazing and cutting-edge code, but not always so good and explaining themselves, and I want to help. In this presentation I want to draw upon my experience in writing tutorials and technical documentation to help you write clear, concise and usable documentation for your own projects.

We will cover topics such as:

- Why write documentation?
- Explaining your point and motivation
- Creating context and meaning
- Writing clear copy
- Creating meaningful examples and tutorials
- Documentation systems and formats
- Making documentation part of build processes
- Testing Docs
- Versioning of Docs

Speakers
avatar for Chris Ward

Chris Ward

Developer Advocate, Crate.IO
Developer Relations, Technical Writing and Editing, (Board) Game Design, Education, Explanation and always more to come.


Tuesday October 4, 2016 14:30 - 15:20
Potsdam I/II

14:30

An Introduction to Linux Control Groups (cgroups) - Michael Kerrisk, man7.org
Control groups (cgroups) are a method of grouping processes for the purpose of monitoring, management, and control. Using cgroups, we can: limit CPU and memory consumption; freeze and resume execution of a group; limit device access; limit the number of processes in a group; and much more. Cgroups are a key building block in modern container systems and are also used in systemd. This tutorial provides an introduction to cgroups, covering both v1 and the recently released v2. The focus is on understanding the operation of the cgroup system itself, rather than going into details of individual controllers. So we'll look at how to create and populate cgroups using shell commands that operate on the cgroup filesystem, and look at topics such as notification, inheritance, and delegation. Bring a laptop so you can walk through some of the examples. No previous cgroups knowledge is assumed.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Kerrisk

Michael Kerrisk

Trainer/consultant, man7.org Training and Consulting
Michael Kerrisk is the author of the acclaimed book, "The Linux Programming Interface" (http://man7.org/tlpi/), a guide and reference for system programming on Linux and UNIX. He contributes to the Linux kernel primarily via documentation, review, and testing of new kernel-user-space... Read More →


Tuesday October 4, 2016 14:30 - 16:20
Tegel

15:30

These Four Questions Will Quickly Tell You If Your Company's OSS Contribution Is Worthwhile - Duane O'Brien, Paypal
Who Cares? Are We Still Using It? Are We Committing Our Own Resources? Can We Develop It All In The Open? By asking these four questions of code you're considering for open source, you can quickly determine if the code is a good candidate, or if you should explore other options. We will look closely at these four questions, why they matter, how to use them, and what those other options might be.

Speakers
avatar for Duane O'Brien

Duane O'Brien

Head of Open Source, Indeed
Duane is the Head of Open Source at Indeed.com, the #1 job site in the world. He is passionate about enabling smart and meaningful contributions to the open source ecosystem by both developers and corporations. Duane navigates the path between engineering and management, drawing on... Read More →


Tuesday October 4, 2016 15:30 - 16:20
Tiergarten

15:30

Efficient Kernel Backporting - Alex Shi, Linaro
In computer/mobile product world, due to the stability, project timeline, etc considerations, latest upstream kernel isn't their preference. The long term stable kernel is. But if you want to some latest features which only is in upstream kernel. You have to backport them to old stable kernel.

This presentation will share the kernel feature backport experience with audience, help them understand how to do backports quickly and effectively without detailed knowledge of the target feature, thus giving more flexibility and Improving productivity when making products.

It will talk by some examples, to discuss how to get info from backport request, how to find necessary commits, how to get dependency, how to resolve conflicts, and finally how to test it.

Speakers
AS

Alex Shi

Linaro
Alex graduated from Central China Normal University. He works for Linaro as Linaro stable kernel maintainer now. Before working for Linaro he worked in Intel Opensource Technical Center in Shanghai, mainly focus on Linux kernel performance tuning.


Tuesday October 4, 2016 15:30 - 16:20
Charlottenburg III
  • Experience Level Any

15:30

Running Linux on Tiny Peripherals - Marcel Holtmann, Intel
This presentation presents running Linux on tiny peripherals with minimal memory requirements.

Speakers
MH

Marcel Holtmann

Prinicpal Engineer, Intel Corporation
Marcel Holtmann is part of Intel's Open Source Technology Center. He is the maintainer of the BlueZ open source Bluetooth stack and has been working on Bluetooth technology since 2001. Marcel chairs the Bluetooth Internet Working Group and is a member of the Bluetooth Architectural... Read More →


Tuesday October 4, 2016 15:30 - 16:20
Potsdam I/II

15:30

(In)security in Open Source - Shane Coughlan, Insignary
Open Source has the potential to deliver faster development cycles and better security than traditional proprietary approaches to software. However, turning the potential of Open Source into reality can be difficult. Recent security issues like Heartbleed, Shellshock and the DROWN attack highlighted some of the challenges that users of Open Source can face. This talk will explore how we can address Open Source security in practical, effective ways.

Speakers
avatar for Shane Coughlan

Shane Coughlan

OpenChain General Manager, Linux Foundation
Shane Coughlan is an expert in communication, security and business development. His professional accomplishments include spearheading the licensing team that elevated Open Invention Network into the largest patent non-aggression community in history, establishing the leading professional... Read More →


Tuesday October 4, 2016 15:30 - 16:20
Potsdam III

15:30

Real Life Example of Scaling Load Balancing Using Open Source on Commodity Hardware - Pavlos Parissis, Booking.com
In order to increase the availability of your application, you place it behind a load balancer. Problem solved but another one is created! How do you make sure this upper layer doesn't become a bottleneck for you? Does it have enough capacity when you go full-on with HTTPS? You need it to be fast, resilient and easy to scale. In this talk I'll present how you combine network protocols and open source software to resolve these problems.

Speakers
avatar for Pavlos Parissis

Pavlos Parissis

Senior Unix System Administrator, Booking.com
Pavlos is a senior system administrator at booking.com, and has been with company for over five years. He's currently on the Global Traffic Distribution team, where he develops solutions and tools to ensure the reliability of the site. He works on load balancing, site speed and management... Read More →


Tuesday October 4, 2016 15:30 - 16:20
Hugos South

16:50

Corporate Trends in Open Source Engagement - Nithya Ruff, Western Digital
Every company has become a technology company and according to the future of open source software 2015 survey, 97% use open source software in one form or another. I will discuss some of the key trends happening in corporations as they encounter open source development and how to be successful in managing open source engagemnt. I will cover areas like Open Source offices, Inner Source, how to collaborate with other companies etc. This is aimed at companies that want to improve how they engage with open source communities and integrate open source into their open innovation strategy. 

Speakers
avatar for Nithya Ruff

Nithya Ruff

Board Chair, Linux Foundation, Comcast
Nithya Ruff is a well-known and well-regarded leader in Open Source. As the Head of Comcast’s Open Source Practice, she is responsible for growing Open Source culture inside of Comcast and engagement with external communities. She is a passionate advocate for opening doors to new... Read More →


Tuesday October 4, 2016 16:50 - 17:40
Köpenick

16:50

How To Write A Linux Security Module That Makes Sense For You - Casey Schaufler, The Smack Project
The traditional Linux security model traces it's fundamentals to the mini-computers of the 1970's. It makes a lot of sense for a machine without a network connection, shared by a handful of friendly collaborators. Linux security modules (LSM) were introduced to address the needs of high security environments. This talk will teach you what you can do with a Linux security module, and what you can't, the difference between a major module and a minor one. Techniques for implementing access controls on files, IPC and sockets will be covered, as will the underlying mechanisms required to maintain the data needed. The difference between inode based schemes and path name based ones will be made clear. In the end you'll have the tools you need to create a module that protects what you care about instead of what seemed like a good idea to a government researcher during the Cold War.

Speakers
avatar for Casey Schaufler

Casey Schaufler

Engineer, Intel
Casey Schaufler worked on Unix kernels in the 1970s-90s. He has implemented access control lists, mandatory access control, extended filesystem attributes, X11 access controls, network protocols and audit systems. His involvement in Linux began with the Linux Security Module work... Read More →


Tuesday October 4, 2016 16:50 - 17:40
Hugos South

16:50

openQA - Avoiding Disasters of Biblical Proportions - Marita Werner, SUSE
openQA is an automated testing tool, capable of full system, console, and graphical application testing. This session will give an introduction to openQA's capabilities, share how it is used by SUSE for the testing of SUSE Linux Enterprise, Fedora for the testing of their distribution, and openSUSE for the testing of both Leap regular release and their Tumbleweed rolling release. The talk will go into some detail as to how openQA tests a very wide range of scenarios, including multiple architectures, extensions and modules, as well as virtual and 'real hardware' platforms. The session will suggest ideas to attendees as how it could be used for testing their software, operating systems, or virtual machine images.

Speakers
avatar for Marita Werner

Marita Werner

QA Project Manager, SUSE Linux GmbH
I joined SUSE's ISV Team in 2010 as Manager of the SUSE Partner Catalog. In 2014 I moved to the SUSE R&D Quality Assurance department as QA Project Manager for the SLE family. I am responsible for the Quality of quite a wide range of products, including SUSE Linux Enterprise Server... Read More →



Tuesday October 4, 2016 16:50 - 17:40
Potsdam III

16:50

Application Profiling and Tuning – Or How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love the Tweak - Igor Ljubuncic, Rackspace
Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.” – Arthur C. Clarke, Clarke’s Third Law Problem solving and troubleshooting is an art. An art of science. Most people have some knowledge and intuition around problem solving, but very few have the right methodologies and tools to do it right. This lab teaches abstract, scientific methods to profiling applications and improving their behavior, stability and performance – with Linux, of course. Using software from our favorite operating system - strace, lsof, perf, to name a few - you will learn how to detect, isolate, analyse and fix every kind of problem that comes your way. Whether you're facing potato farm crop issues, spaceship performance or just plain-ole IT woes, this lab has it all.

Speakers
avatar for Igor Ljubuncic

Igor Ljubuncic

Strategy and Business Consultant, Dedoimedo
Igor Ljubuncic is a physicist by vocation and a Linux geek by profession. Igor comes with 13 years of experience in the hi-tech industry, including medical, high-performance computing, data center, cloud, and hosting fields, with emphasis on complex problem solving and the scientific... Read More →


Tuesday October 4, 2016 16:50 - 17:40
Tiergarten

16:50

From git tag to dnf update: How Linux Kernel Gets Released - Konstantin Ryabitsev, The Linux Foundation
Go on a journey through the kernel.org and fedoraproject.org infrastructures all the way from the moment Linus does "git tag" to when your computer pops up a notification that new kernel updates are available.

Speakers
avatar for Konstantin Ryabitsev

Konstantin Ryabitsev

Director, IT Projects, The Linux Foundation
Long-time systems administrator responsible for infrastructure security at The Linux Foundation.


Tuesday October 4, 2016 16:50 - 17:40
Charlottenburg III
 
Wednesday, October 5
 

11:00

Clang: Much More than Just a C/C++ Compiler - Tilmann Scheller, Samsung Electronics
With the Clang C/C++ frontend built on top of LLVM, Linux developers get a powerful optimizing compiler.
While compiling source code is the core task of Clang, it can also be used for much more than just compiling code: the built-in static analyzer detects bugs at compile time, clang-format allows for automatic source code formatting, clang-tidy enables heavier checks which go beyond traditional compiler warnings, the AddressSanitizer/MemorySanitizer tools help to detect memory corruption bugs early and with LibFuzzer there is an integrated solution for fuzz testing as well.
Various Clang-based source code navigators allow for accurate browsing through even the most complex C++ codebases, where traditional tools like Ctags are struggling heavily.
This talk will introduce the various different tools available as part of Clang and highlight the benefits they provide to Linux developers.

Speakers
TS

Tilmann Scheller

LLVM Compiler Engineer, Samsung Electronics
Tilmann Scheller is a Principal Compiler Engineer working in the Samsung Open Source Group, his primary focus is on the ARM/AArch64 backends of LLVM. He has been working on LLVM since 2007 and has held previous positions involving LLVM at NVIDIA and Apple.


Wednesday October 5, 2016 11:00 - 11:50
Tiergarten

11:00

Linux-Kernel Memory Ordering: Help Arrives At Last! - Paul E. McKenney, IBM
It has been said that Documentation/memory-barriers.txt can be used to frighten small children, and perhaps this is true. But even if it is true, it is woefully inefficient. After all, there is a huge number of children in this world, so a correspondingly huge amount of time and effort would be required in order to read it to them all.

This situation clearly calls for an automated tool, which is the topic of this talk, and which is now available in prototype form. This tool takes short fragments of concurrent C code as input, and exhaustively analyzes the possible results. In other words, instead of perusing memory-barriers.txt to find the answer to a memory-ordering question, you can get your answer by writing a small test case and feeding it to the tool. This talk will give an introduction to this tool, describing how to use it and how it works, including a short demo.

Speakers
avatar for Paul McKenney

Paul McKenney

Distinguished Engineer, IBM Linux Technology Center, Beaverton
Paul E. McKenney is a Distinguished Engineer with the IBM Linux Technology Center, where he maintains the RCU implementation within the Linux kernel. He has been coding for four decades, more than half of that on parallel hardware. His prior lives include the DYNIX/ptx kernel at Sequent... Read More →


Wednesday October 5, 2016 11:00 - 11:50
Charlottenburg III

11:00

OpenStack Swift - Christian Schwede, Red Hat
OpenStack Swift - 101: Swift is an open source object storage system that is highly available, distributed, eventually consistent object/blob store. Organizations can use Swift to store lots of data efficiently, safely, and cheaply. In this session, Mahati will cover an overview of Swift's architecture, its use cases, some of it's interesting features and sample code snippets/commands on how to inspect a stored object.

Speakers
avatar for Christian Schwede

Christian Schwede

Principal Software Engineer, Red Hat
Christian started working on Swift about two years ago and works as a Principal Software Engineer at Red Hat. Most of his Swift related work is related to supporting customers running Swift and working on automation, testing and development tools.


Wednesday October 5, 2016 11:00 - 11:50
Potsdam I/II

11:00

Locking Down Your Systemd Services - Lennart Poettering, Red Hat
systemd is the system and service manager of most of today's popular Linux distributions. This talk will focus on security features of systemd, that help developers and administrators to lock down system services in powerful ways, in order to build a more secure Operating System. Topics covered are: file system namespace features for services, networking lock-in, seccomp sandboxing, Linux security capabilities, integration with MAC security and many more. The talk will explain how many default services shipped in the various Linux distributions already make use of these security features to minimize impact of services, and how developers, devops engineers and administrators can enable this features easily for their own services, with just a few settings.

Speakers
LP

Lennart Poettering

Principal Software Engineer, Red Hat
Lennart works on systemd, for Red Hat.


Wednesday October 5, 2016 11:00 - 11:50
Köpenick

11:00

Quality Assessment and Assurance to Provide 'Industrial Grade Linux' - Carsten Emde, Open Source Automation Development Lab (OSADL)
Using Linux in industrial products and particularly its real-time capabilities requires exact knowledge of the systems' reliability and stability. To be able to fix stability issues, meticulous monitoring of a large number of system variables and messages including console output is required. The latter is used to assist post-mortem debugging.

The Open Source Automation Development Lab (OSADL) operates a test center dubbed "QA Farm" where more than 120 different embedded Linux systems (x86, ARM, PowerPC, MIPS) are continuously monitored under idle, average and extreme CPU and GPU load. Kernel versions that proved to be stable on all system during a given interval are labelled "Latest Stable" and recommended for use in industrial products.

Speakers
CE

Carsten Emde

General Manager, Open Source Automation Development Lab (OSADL)
Carsten Emde has spent more than 25 years as a software developer, system integrator and software consultant for industrial computer systems. Among others, he is specialized on real time, video and image processing. Since founding the Open Source Automation Development Lab (OSADL... Read More →


Wednesday October 5, 2016 11:00 - 11:50
Potsdam III
  • Experience Level Any

12:00

entry_*.S: A Carefree Stroll through Kernel Entry Code - Borislav Petkov, SUSE
I have always wondered what happens when we enter the kernel from
userspace: what preparations does the hardware meet when the userspace
to kernel space switch instructions are executed and back, and what does
the kernel do when it executes a system call. There are also a bunch of
things it does before it executes the actual syscall so I try to look at
those too.

This talk is an attempt to demystify some of the aspects of the cryptic
x86 entry code in arch/x86/entry/ written in assembly and how does
that all fit with software-visible architecture of x86, what hardware
features are being used and how.

With the hope to get more people excited about this funky piece of the
kernel and maybe have the same fun we're having.

Speakers
BP

Borislav Petkov

SUSE
RAS/AMD kernel maintainer working currenly at SUSE Labs. Prior to that at AMDs Operating Systems Research Center doing Linux enablement and hardware debugging work.


Wednesday October 5, 2016 12:00 - 12:50
Charlottenburg III

12:00

SFQM & Doctor: Keeping My (Telco) Cloud Afloat - Emma Foley, Intel
Collectd exposes statistics that facilitate more resilient and performant telco/NFV clouds.

It is vital to monitor systems for malfunctions that could lead to users' application service disruption and promptly react to these fault events to facilitate improving overall system performance.

By providing OpenStack with system statistics from collectd, there is more data available, which can be used for monitoring, performance analysis, fault detection, etc. using OPNFV Doctor-prescribed enhancements to OpenStack, action can then be taken to negate the effects of any faults in the deployment.

Gaps have been identified and work to improve OpenStack to enable a more fault tolerant cloud environment is well underway. A key part of this work includes expanding the amount of data available about the system (e.g. DPDK statistics), and improving alarming functionality in OpenStack Aodh.

Moderators
EF

Emma Foley

Software Engineer, Intel
Emma is a Software Engineer in the Network Platforms Group in Intel. Emma has worked on Service Assurance, making more statistics available for the OpenStack cloud, by enabling collectd stats and events to be used in OpenStack. She is committer to the OPNFV Barometer project, and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Carlos Goncalves

Carlos Goncalves

Software Specialist, NEC Laboratories Europe
Carlos Goncalves is a Software Specialist on the 5G Networks team at NEC Laboratories Europe in Heidelberg, Germany. He works in the areas of Network Functions Virtualization and Carrier-Cloud Operation & Management, developing novel technologies and tools for the design, deployment... Read More →
avatar for Harry van Haaren

Harry van Haaren

Network Software Engineer, Intel
Harry van Haaren is a network software engineer optimizing DPDK and OVS. Interests range from high-performance API design to making every last instruction-per-cycle count towards your computing requirements. [NOTE: The "Measuring Software Performance" session will be 15 minutes... Read More →
avatar for Maryam Tahhan

Maryam Tahhan

Network Software Engineer, Intel Corporation
Maryam Tahhan is a Network Software Engineer at Intel Corporation. Her focus has been on virtual switching, virtual switch performance and enabling service assurance features in DPDK. She leads 2 open source projects in OPNFV: VSPERF (vSwitch Performance Characterization) and SFQM... Read More →


Wednesday October 5, 2016 12:00 - 12:50
Köpenick
  • Experience Level Any

12:00

Tracking Huge Files with Git LFS - Steve Smith, Atlassian
Developers love Git for its raw speed, powerful history traversal, distributed nature, and (of course) the fact that it was originally built by Linus Torvalds. What we don't love is the fact that, out of the box, Git has poor support for tracking large binary files!

Fortunately, developers from Atlassian and GitHub have teamed up to work on an open source, MIT licensed project to solve this problem: Git LFS (Large File Support). This means researchers, web designers, game or desktop application developers, multimedia producers and any other Linux ecosystem participants who need to version large data, rich media, or binaries, can move off legacy centralized systems and start using modern version control.

In this session I'll cover the computer science behind Git LFS' internals & architecture, CLI usage and how to build an effective Git LFS workflow for an open source team.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Smith

Steve Smith

Devops Advocate, Atlassian
Steve Smith has worked at Atlassian for over 8 years, both as a sysadmin and a developer. Prior to that he worked on tanks and radars in the Outer Hebrides, telecoms systems in Hong Kong, and in startups in Australia. He now works out of Atlassian's Amsterdam offices, focusing on... Read More →


Wednesday October 5, 2016 12:00 - 12:50
Tiergarten
  • Experience Level Any

12:00

Demystifying the Storage Management Challenge Using Industry Wide Collaboration - Steven Tan, Huawei & John Mark Walker, Dell EMC
Cloud computing frameworks like Kubernetes are designed to address containerized application management using "service" level abstraction for delivering smart data center manageability. Storage management intelligence and interfaces need to evolve to support "service" oriented abstraction. Having every computing framework reinvent the storage integration makes the storage management more challenging from end user perspective. Moreover it adds significant burden on storage vendors to write drivers and certify for every orchestration stack which is least desirable. Industry wide collaboration is needed to address storage management in an open way that supports traditional and cloud computing frameworks. In this panel, we will cover the motivation behind Linux Foundation OpenSDS project, objectives, technical focus and governance.

Speakers
ST

Steven Tan

VP & CTO Cloud Storage Solution, Huawei
Steven Tan is OpenSDS TSC chair, and VP & CTO Cloud Solution at Futurewei where he is responsible for cloud solutions, and open-source collaboration. Steven brings over 20 years of engineering experience spanning cloud, virtualization, data security, data management, and storage... Read More →


Wednesday October 5, 2016 12:00 - 12:50
Hugos South

12:00

The World of 100G Networking - Christoph Lameter
2015 saw the arrival of multiple 100Gbps networking technologies: Fast 100G Ethernet switches, Mellanox released EDR (100G Infiniband) and Intel came up with OmniPath (also 100G). 2016 is therefore likely going to be a battleground of these competing technologies. Facebook already is supposed to upgrade their infrastructure to 100G in 2015 and its likely that others are going to follow. This talk gives an overview about the competing technologies in terms of technological differences and capabilities and then discusses the challenges of using various kernel interfaces to communicate at these high speeds (POSIX, RDMA, OFI).
Hopefully we can come up with some ideas how to improve the situation.

Speakers
avatar for Christoph Lameter

Christoph Lameter

R&D Team Lead, Jump Trading LLC
Christoph Lameter is working as a lead in research and development for Jump Trading LLC (an algorithmic trading company) in Chicago and maintains the slab allocators and the per cpu subsystems in the Linux Kernel. He contributed to a number of Linux projects since the initial kernel... Read More →


Wednesday October 5, 2016 12:00 - 12:50
Potsdam I/II

14:30

Flowgrind: A TCP Traffic Generator for Developers - Arnd Hannemann, credativ GmbH
During the last decades TCP and the networks it is used in steadily evolved. To aid further development it is crucial to give researchers and developers measurement tools so they can evaluate and analyze their TCP modifications in real world network environments. In this presentation we show our tool flowgrind. Unlike existing measurement tools, flowgrind's distributed architecture allows for an easy setup of complex scenarios (Fairness measurements with different congestion control mechanisms, cross-traffic, separation of test and control traffic etc.). Besides the usual application perceived metrics it can also measure core variables from the operating system's TCP implementation (tcp_info struct) thus enabling the developers to analyze and understand the interactions between TCP and the underlying network.

Speakers
AH

Arnd Hannemann

Technical Lead, credativ GmbH
Arnd Hannemann has more than 15 years experience in developing and maintaining Linux systems. Since starting to work within the GNU/Linux open source ecosystem he has been involved in several Open Source projects including the Linux kernel. He studied Computer Science at the RWTH... Read More →


Wednesday October 5, 2016 14:30 - 15:20
Charlottenburg I/II

14:30

IPv6 for Server Admins and Client Developers - Thiago Macieira, Intel
IPv6 is the evolution of the Internet Protocol and was created in the late 1990s when it was clear that the then-current version (IPv4) would run out of available addresses soon. Soon after, software was converted to handle IPv6 and the all service providers began offering IPv6 connectivity. Right? Not really. It's been a chicken-and-the-egg problem: no apps supports it, so services don't support it, so no apps supports it. This session will go over the basics of IPv6, how it differs from IPv4 and what client and server developers should be aware of. It will go over the basic socket API and provide instruction for developers on how to write software capable of both IPv4 and v6, seamlessly. It will then discuss how IPv6 and certain features not available in IPv4 can be used for interesting functionality, but also what admins would want to be aware of to protect their systems.

Speakers
avatar for Thiago Macieira

Thiago Macieira

Engineer, Open Source Technology Center, Intel
Thiago Macieira holds a double degree in Engineering and an MBA. He has been involved in several Open Source projects for over 15 years and is an experienced C++ developer, having spent the better part of the last 10 years developing Qt and Qt-based software. He has been involved... Read More →


Wednesday October 5, 2016 14:30 - 15:20
Potsdam I/II

14:30

Reimagining OpenStack - Samuel Ortiz, Intel
OpenStack is an open source alternative to proprietary cloud solutions, but customers struggle with deployment, scalability, and performance problems. Design a Cloud today and you’d approach things in a radically different way. Nova, OpenStack’s core compute component, is described as a "bloated busy kitchen filled with technical debt" by an original author. The open source CIAO project (Cloud Integrated Advanced Orchestrator) reimagines Cloud from scratch in the Go programming language. CIAO seeks to demonstrate how to move the needle on performance and meet the demands of the modern cloud. CIAO is fully TLS based, minimal config, easily updatable and optimized-for-speed. Containers and VMs are equal citizen user workloads, providing a scalable elastic cloud. This presentation will highlight CIAO’s innovative architecture and compare implementation details relative to OpenStack.

Speakers
SO

Samuel Ortiz

Principal Software Engineer, Intel
I work at the Intel Open Source Technology Center where I spend my time playing with containers, virtual machines, hypervisors and orchestrators. Although I am currently contributing to Kata Containers, CRI-O, QEMU, NEMU and rust-vmm, I used to work on obscure networking protocols... Read More →


Wednesday October 5, 2016 14:30 - 15:20
Köpenick

14:30

What's Up in the Land of the Linux Kernel - Thorsten Leemhuis, Heise Medien GmbH
This presentation provides an overview of recent and current developments in the Linux kernel, which is the heart of any Linux system. The talk will discuss what major changes recent kernel versions brought and thus now show up in the latest Linux distributions. It will also discuss improvement the next kernel version will contain or are currently being discussed for later releases. In that scope the presentation sometimes will discuss changes in software which interacts closely with the kernel or its drivers (Mesa, nft, …)

In addition to new features this talk will sometimes take a metalevel look on kernel development: what is working well, how fast is it, what is done to improve things and what are the biggest challenges the kernel developers face right now.

Speakers
avatar for Thorsten Leemhuis

Thorsten Leemhuis

Editor, c't/Heise Medien
Thorsten works as an editor for Heise Medien, which publishes the German c't magazine and runs the tech news site heise.de. For both he writes a column called "Kernel Log", which regularly discusses developments in the Linux kernel and areas close to it. Thorsten also was a major... Read More →


Wednesday October 5, 2016 14:30 - 15:20
Tiergarten

14:30

ELK: A Log Files Management Framework - Giovanni Bechis, SNB S.r.l.
Managing log files is every day harder when you have to districate with lot of gigabytes of data and different file formats.
The ELK stack (ElasticSearch, Logstash, Kibana) is a great solution to this problem, with Logstash you can collect, parse and manage log files in an easy and productive way from different sources.
It can also provide important informations out of your log files with an easy to use web interface, and it can be integrated with a monitoring and alerting system.
The ELK stack is not only dedicated to log management but it can be used to aggregate any kind of data in an impressive and very productive way.

Speakers
avatar for Giovanni Bechis

Giovanni Bechis

Ceo / Software Developer, SNB S.r.l.
I started working with Linux and *BSD in late 90's, I worked as Linux and FreeBSD system administrator in a software house. In 2005 I founded my own software house, we create web solutions, hosting and ICT solutions. From 2008 I am an OpeBSD committer and I develop ports and some... Read More →


Wednesday October 5, 2016 14:30 - 15:20
Potsdam III

15:40

Open Enterprise & Open Community - Empowering Each Other - Richard Brown, SUSE
Who said Enterprises and Open Source Communities can't mix?

SUSE Linux Enterprise is able to provide the solid platform to customers thanks largely to a community project that experiments and implements many of the innovative technologies that you see in commercial products today. That community project is openSUSE.

This talk will discuss the latest developments in the openSUSE Project, specifically the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling distribution, and the openSUSE Leap hybrid distribution.

It will also shed light on other technologies being developed inside openSUSE, such as OBS and openQA and share insights into some possibilities for the future.

It will also detail areas where the openSUSE project directly impacts Enterprise customers, and the benefits of SLE customers being more involved as community members.

Speakers
RB

Richard Brown

openSUSE Chairman, SUSE


Wednesday October 5, 2016 15:40 - 16:30
Köpenick

15:40

Linux Kernel Security Update - James Morris, Oracle
In this presentation, I'll provide an update on the current state of the Linux kernel security subsystem. We'll start with a brief overview of Linux kernel security, then discuss 
changes which have occurred during the v4.0 kernel series. We'll also discuss the current threat landscape, and ongoing development in areas such as static checking, fuzzing, and kernel self-protection.

Speakers
avatar for James Morris

James Morris

Kernel Developer, Microsoft
James is the maintainer of the Linux security subsystem, and kernel engineer at Microsoft.


Wednesday October 5, 2016 15:40 - 16:30
Tiergarten

15:40

OpenDaylight Performance Report - Daniel Farrell, Red Hat
Get the latest on OpenDaylight’s performance, including the just-released OpenDaylight Boron Performance Whitepaper and OPNFV CPerf’s Colorado Results.

OpenDaylight’s performance testing community produces a user-focused performance whitepaper for each OpenDaylight release. The OpenDaylight Boron release and the OpenDaylight Summit are just before LinuxCon EU 2016, and will mark the culmination of many performance testing efforts. An overview and analysis of these hot-of-the-presses results will be presented.

OPNFV’s CPerf project tests SDN controller performance in the large, realistic deployments required for NFV. While the exact date isn’t set, OPNFV’s Colorado release will likely be very close to LinuxCon EU 2016. CPerf’s Colorado results will be presented.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Farrell

Daniel Farrell

Software Engineer, Red Hat
Daniel Farrell is a Software Engineer on Red Hat’s SDN Team, where he contributes to upstream ODL and OPNFV. He has been involved in SDN since it emerged from Stanford, including early OpenFlow and OpenStack work. He’s now an active committer on ODL’s Integration Team. During... Read More →


Wednesday October 5, 2016 15:40 - 16:30
Schöneberg

15:40

Graphite@Scale or How to Store Millon Metrics per Second - Vladimir Smirnov, Booking.com
This is a story about dealing with metrics at scale. A lot of metrics.

This is our story of the challenges we’ve faced at Booking.com and how we made our Graphite system handle millions of metrics per second.

Speakers
VS

Vladimir Smirnov

System Administrator, Booking.com
I've dealt with large scale systems design and administration in IT for over 6 years. For the last 8 month I've been working Booking.com, specializing in scaling our Graphite stack, improving its reliability and performance. We at Booking.com have hundreds of backend servers, hundreds... Read More →


Wednesday October 5, 2016 15:40 - 16:30
Potsdam III

15:40

Kernel Development - I Still Think We Have a Scaling Problem - Wolfram Sang, Consultant
An often heard statement from the media regarding the Linux Kernel development cycle: "The overall picture ... is one of a development process that continues to function like a relatively well-tuned machine. The number of contributors continues to increase, the patch flow is steady, and there do not appear to be many process-scalability issues in sight." (LWN on May 11th, 2016). While I agree that we do a great job, I don't think all is well, especially when it comes to scalability. Two years ago, I already gave a talk to point out some issues. So, let's see if we got any better in these areas or if we need a "Linuxbleed" or "Kernelshock" before these areas change.

Speakers
WS

Wolfram Sang

Consultant / Maintainer, Freelancer
Wolfram Sang has been working as a Linux kernel developer for embedded systems since 2008. He maintains the I2C subsystem and works as a consultant, mainly for the Renesas Upstream Kernel Team. Programming since his childhood, he still hacks his machines from the 80s, especially the... Read More →


Wednesday October 5, 2016 15:40 - 16:30
Charlottenburg III
  • Experience Level Any

15:40

The Future of Open Source Automotive Software - Dan Cauchy, The Linux Foundation

Car hacking continues to be a concern and high profile software bugs are on the rise and in the news at an alarming frequency. The traditional way of developing automotive software is not working. OEMs are starting to adopt an open source approach to change the way software is built for cars.

Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) is a Linux Foundation Collaboration Project that is bringing together OEMs and suppliers to build a shared platform from the ground-up for in-vehicle infotainment. Dan Cauchy will provide an update on the latest AGL activities and discuss how AGL and GENIVI have been collaborating in various areas of open source automotive software, and what lies ahead in the future. He will also discuss how developing a common platform and building an ecosystem and supply chain that all use the same code base will transform the traditional automotive supply chain model, reduce fragmentation, improve time-to-market and enable companies to focus more on rapid innovation and new features. 


Speakers
avatar for Dan Cauchy

Dan Cauchy

Linux Foundation/Automotive Grade Linux


Wednesday October 5, 2016 15:40 - 16:30
Hugos South

16:40

Strategic Use of Free Software at Siemens - Karsten Gerloff, Siemens
Siemens is a large engineering company making highly complex products. Often, these products are mission critical for customers, or form crucial bits of civil infrastructure. A large and growing part of their functionality is implemented in software. Free Software components already are important building blocks in many Siemens products.

How does Siemens use Free Software, and why? What's the strategic importance of Free Software for the company? And how does Siemens engage with the global community?

While Free Software has been widely adopted in the software business world, there is considerably less public discussion about its take-up in the world of "traditional" industry. At the same time, industrial companies are increasingly making use of Free Software, and are becoming more involved in t

Speakers
KG

Karsten Gerloff

Karsten is a member of the Open Source governance team at Siemens, one of the world´s largest industrial technology companies. He supports FOSS strategy, compliance and engagement. Prior to joining Siemens, Karsten led the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) from 2009-15, advocating... Read More →


Wednesday October 5, 2016 16:40 - 17:30
Hugos South

16:40

lguest: A Journey of Learning the Linux Kernel Internals - Daniel Baluta, Intel
Lguest is a small hypervisor for running Linux under Linux on x86 architecture and the best source to learn about virtualization and Linux kernel internals. The story was written by Rusty Russel around 2007, with several brave people trying to port it on x86_64 and ARM.

The lguest adventure will walk you into boot code, paravirtulization, x86 assembly arid lands, virtio, segmentation, virtual/physical memory, hypercalls, interrupts. Understanding lguest is an arduous journey but we have an amazing help in the comments and source code narrated with a great sense of humour by lguest master: Rusty.

At the end of the presentation you will be exposed to some of the challenges of porting lguest to other architectures, mainly x86_64 and ARM as the speaker heroically tried for the past few years.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Baluta

Daniel Baluta

Linux Kernel Engineer at NXP, NXP
Daniel works at NXP in Romania hacking on Linux kernel audio drivers for i.MX boards. He is a teaching assistant for Operating System Internals class at University POLITEHNICA in Bucharest and very passionate about helping newcomers to the Linux kernel world while being a mentor for... Read More →


Wednesday October 5, 2016 16:40 - 17:30
Charlottenburg III

16:40

Linux DRM: New Picture Processing API - Marek Szyprowski, Samsung Electronics Polska Sp. z o.o.
Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) framework with Kernel Mode Setting (KMS) became generic API for the graphics display stack for Linux. Recently introduced extensions like atomic mode setting and universal planes allows to expose most of the features of the graphics display subsystem to generic applications, which don't need to use any hardware specific API. The next common part of graphics hardware (especially in the embedded systems) are various picture processing modules (i.e. copying, colour space conversion, scaling, rotation, etc). Such blocks can be used by vendor specific extensions. However this is not the best approach, especially if one want to design some hardware-independent application. This talk will focus on presenting the new proposal for the extension to the DRM subsystem, which provides access to the picture processing hardware blocks in the unified and generic way.

Speakers
MS

Marek Szyprowski

Samsung Electronics Polska Sp. z o.o.
Marek is a Linux kernel developer at Samsung R&D Institute, Warsaw, Poland. He specializes in embedded systems. His ongoing effort is to provide better support for Samsung SoC in the Linux kernel. This includes core platform support as well as various updates to the device drivers... Read More →


Wednesday October 5, 2016 16:40 - 17:30
Tiergarten

16:40

NorNet -- Building an Inter-Continental Internet Testbed Based on Open Source Software - Thomas Dreibholz, Simula Research Laboratory
NorNet is an open, international Internet testbed platform for research on multi-homed systems. Multi-homed systems have the property of being connected to multiple Internet Service Providers (ISP) simultaneously, in order to still provide connectivity in case of ISP/network failures. Basis of NorNet is Linux, together with other Open Source software. At the moment, the testbed infrastructure spreads over 21 sites on 4 continents.

NorNet makes extensive use of advanced Linux features like virtualisation, file system features, routing rules, SCTP, MPTCP, and more. The global distribution creates further challenges. Goal of this talk is therefore to provide an overview of the problems that occurred when building the testbed, as well as solutions and lessons learned from solving these challenges. The idea is to present guidelines for utilising the advanced Linux features in own projects.

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Dreibholz

Thomas Dreibholz

Senior Research Engineer, Simula Research Laboratory
Thomas Dreibholz works as Senior Research Engineer at the Centre for Resilient Networks and Applications (CRNA) of the Simula Research Laboratory in Fornebu, Norway. He has published and presented more than 65 research contributions at international conferences and in journals. Furthermore... Read More →


Wednesday October 5, 2016 16:40 - 17:30
Potsdam I/II

16:40

Using the Linux Tracing Infrastructure - Jan Altenberg, linutronix GmbH
The Linux kernel offers a lot of great debugging tools. The most powerful one is the tracing infrastructure. It's not just one single debugging method, it offers a lot of different methods for collecting and analyzing data within the Operating System. This presentation will give an introduction to the usage of the tracing infrastructure and the different methods for collecting data. This includes: Event tracing, using the tracers, collecting events during the boot process, dynamically adding events using kprobes and injecting events into your application with uprobes. It will also cover the tools which can be used for tracing, like trace-cmd and kernelshark. Furthermore the usage of the perf CTF converting function (which can be used to analyze traces with Tracecompass and Eclipse) will be explained.

Speakers
avatar for Jan Altenberg

Jan Altenberg

open source trainer / project manager, linutronix GmbH
Jan Altenberg has more than 10 years experience in developing and maintaining Embedded Linux systems. He studied information technologies at the University of Cooperative Education in Stuttgart (Germany). From 2002 - 2006 he was involved in the OCEAN project, a european research project... Read More →


Wednesday October 5, 2016 16:40 - 17:30
Potsdam III
 
Thursday, October 6
 

10:50

FOSSology: Efficient License Analysis (in HD!) - Michael Jaeger, Siemens AG
The Linux Foundation Collaboration Project FOSSology is an OSS framework and Web application mostly used to identify licenses and copyrights in OSS components. FOSSology involves different scan approaches and with a streamlined UI, it allows for efficient assessment of scanner findings. The output is a clarification of involved licenses in OSS components. The tutorial will show and explain: * How does the license situation of open source software look like? * What does FOSSology find actually? * How to generate results with FOSSology for SPDX and debian-copyright files? * How to do reuse of already analyzed components when scanning a newer version? * How can I handle new license statements? * HD? FOSSology enables identification of licenses at a high precision level - the tutorial explains the pitfalls of license statement interpretation and how to cover that.

Speakers
avatar for Michael C. Jaeger

Michael C. Jaeger

SW360 Specialist, FOSSology.org / Siemens AG


Thursday October 6, 2016 10:50 - 11:40
Tiergarten

10:50

Chrome OS Running Android in a Container - Dylan Reid, Google
Chromebooks recently added Google Play, the most popular app store in the world. In this presentation, Dylan will discuss the details of how the android system is run on Chromebooks, how kernel container and graphics driver features made this possible, how audio/video are played from the Android container, and how the famous Chromebook security level was maintained.

Speakers
DR

Dylan Reid

Software Engineer, Google
Dylan Reid (Google) - Dylan works on the Chromium OS project for Google. He has been focused on Chromium OS audio for the past few years, working on drivers, middle ware, audio processing and the Chrome browser. Recently he started the effort to run Android in a container on Chrome... Read More →


Thursday October 6, 2016 10:50 - 11:40
Hugos South

10:50

Efficient Unit Test and Fuzz Tools for Kernel/Libc Porting - Bamvor Jian Zhang, Huawei/Linaro
Bamvor has encountered lots of syscall issues such as wrong number of arguments, different data type in binary interface when working on the ILP32 ABI for ARMv8 in the last two years. He realized that the correctness of argument passing between the C library and core kernel code is a common problem when bringing up new architecture or ABI to kernel and libc. Existing fuzz testing tools such as trinity and skzkaller only generate random or boundary values for syscall parameters and then inject them into kernel, but those tools won't validate if the results of those syscalls are correct or not. Thus they can not act as a unit test for ILP32. Bamvor Jian Zhang would like to share how to improve trinity to serve this purpose.

Speakers
avatar for Bamvor Jian Zhang

Bamvor Jian Zhang

Senior Architecture, Eking Technology
Bamvor Jian Zhang is a software engineer in Huawei who focuses on linux kernel and relative areas. Currently he's working on ILP32 for ARM64, which supports running legacy 32bit code on ARM64. He gave a presentation in Opensuse Asia Summit, and also some presentations in local open... Read More →


Thursday October 6, 2016 10:50 - 11:40
Charlottenburg III
  • Experience Level Any

10:50

Persistent Memory Usage within Linux Environment - Maciej Maciejewski & Krzysztof Czurylo, Intel
Byte-addressable Persistent Memory is an emerging technology expected to soon have a dramatic and disruptive impact on software. Usage of persistent memory requires a different approach to data handling within applications.
In this talk we will examine the primary differences between persistent memory, storage devices, and regular DRAM. We shall present how Persistent Memory is exposed to the OS with ACPI extensions, and describe the resulting changes made upstream to the Linux kernel to provide direct access (known as "DAX" in Linux). We shall present how versatility of Persistent Memory can be utilized by the applications, and what impact does it have on the overall system. Finally, an open source library, known as the NVML (http://pmem.io), providing persistent memory allocation, transactions, and other features useful to applications will be shortly described.

Speakers
KC

Krzysztof Czuryło

Senior Software Engineer, Intel
Krzysztof Czuryło is a Software Architect at Intel, having over 15 years of experience in databases, networking/telecommunication and 3D graphics. For the last three years he is mostly focused on persistent memory programming and algorithms providing effective and fail-safe usage... Read More →
avatar for Maciej Maciejewski

Maciej Maciejewski

Senior Software Engineer, Intel
Maciej Maciejewski is a software professional working in a high-tech industry since 10 years. For eight years he has worked at ADVA Optical Networking as a Senior Software Manager, and an architect on distributed and stateless applications within network management systems area. Currently... Read More →


Thursday October 6, 2016 10:50 - 11:40
Potsdam I/II

10:50

Towards Sustainable Systems with the Civil Infrastructure Platform - Urs Gleim, Siemens AG, Corporate Technology & Yoshitake Kobayashi, Toshiba
Linux has become one of the most important software component to run civil infrastructure systems such as power plants, water distributions, traffic controls or healthcare systems. However, there are still gaps to fill regarding domain-specific requirements such as safety, reliability or real-time. At the same time, rapid advances in machine-to-machine connectivity are driving changes in industrial system architectures and
raise the importance of long-term support for security.

The Linux Foundation established "Civil Infrastructure Platform (CIP)" as a new collaborative project. CIP aims at developing a super long-term supported open source "base layer" of industrial grade software. This base layer consists of software building blocks that meet requirements of industrial and civil infrastructure systems. In this talk, we will explain technical details and focuses of this project.

Speakers
avatar for Urs Gleim

Urs Gleim

Head of Smart Embedded Systems, Siemens AG
Urs Gleim is leading the embedded systems group at Siemens Corporate Technology which hosts the Corporate Competence Center Embedded Linux. This team centrally provides Linux and related technologies for various Siemens products. Additionally, he is the Chair of the Governing Board... Read More →
avatar for Yoshitake Kobayashi

Yoshitake Kobayashi

Senior Manager of Open Source Technology department, Toshiba Corporation
Yoshitake Kobayashi is the Senior Manager of The Open Source Technology Department at Toshiba Corporation. The team provides a Linux based system and related technologies such as Database and Web application frameworks for various Toshiba products. His research interests include operating... Read More →


Thursday October 6, 2016 10:50 - 11:40
Köpenick
  • Experience Level Any

10:50

Visualize Your Code Repos and More with Gource - Dawn M. Foster, The Scale Factory
Why settle for boring numbers and static graphs to describe your open source project when you can dynamically display the movements and activity within your project? Gource is an amazing and flexible tool that can be used to display activity from your repositories using a video visualization that people love!

With this flexibility comes a dizzying array of options and configurations. This talk will show some of the more useful options within Gource to help you select the ones that will work best for your project. Gource can also be used to display non-repository information (bug trackers or mailing lists) using the custom log format. Other topics include related tools, generating video files, and more.

The goal is for you to walk away from this talk with ideas and techniques for how to create awesome videos showing the activity within your open source projects and communities.

Speakers
avatar for Dawn Foster

Dawn Foster

Director of Open Source Community Strategy, VMware
Dawn is the Director of Open Source Community Strategy at VMware within the Open Source Program Office. She has 20+ years of experience at companies like Intel and Puppet with expertise in community building, strategy, open source software, metrics, and more. She is passionate about... Read More →


Thursday October 6, 2016 10:50 - 11:40
Potsdam III
  • Experience Level Any

11:50

Build Your Own ChromeOS distro and Image Server - Ronald G. Minnich, Google
ChromeOS is a very popular software stack, and Chromebooks have recently passed Macs in market share. But the ChromeOS stack is for more than just end users: ChromeOS is an open source system which lets any user build their own version of the stack and, further, make their Chrome devices use that stack, from their server. In other words, you can buy a Chromebook, flip it to developer mode, and have it run *your* ChromeOS stack, not the one it comes with. Further, you can run your own server so that over the air (OTA) updates come from you, not anyone else, using the same technology that Google uses. If you are good with a screwdriver, you can even rewrite the keys so that you can run your Chromebook in its secure mode, but still use your distro and no other. In this talk, I'll describe how you build/run a ChromeOS OTA server and run your personal ChromeOS on any network-attached device.

Speakers
avatar for Ron Minnich

Ron Minnich

Software Engineer, Google
linuxboot, u-root, coreboot, linuxbios, ... all open source firmwarelinux kernel, servers,


Thursday October 6, 2016 11:50 - 12:40
Hugos South

11:50

Documenting Your Software Supply Chain with Linked Data - Yev Bronshteyn, Black Duck Software
What’s in your software other than your code? Most likely, other people’s software. And what’s inside that software? More other people’s software. And each layer of that vast layer cake comes with its own licensing license agreements, copyrights, origin information, and, alas, vulnerabilities. To document all that, you’d need far more than an ingredient label and, preferably, something other than a COPYING file the size of "War and Peace".

In this presentation, we’ll examine the possibilities offered by Linked Data. We’ll talk about the fundamentals of Linked Data and RDF, its incarnations and formats (Turtle, RDF/XML, Thrift, JSON-LD), query language (SPARQL), tooling, and more. We’ll then look at SPDX, Linux Foundation's standard for using Linked Data to document component relationships, licenses, copyrights, and even vulnerabilities.

Speakers
avatar for Yev Bronshteyn

Yev Bronshteyn

Senior Software Engineer - Alliances, Black Duck Software/Synopsys
Yev Bronshteyn is a Senior Software Engineer at Black Duck Software, working on solutions for open source governance and security. He is a contributor to the SPDX technical team, which defines the Linux Foundation standard for documenting deep software package information with linked... Read More →



Thursday October 6, 2016 11:50 - 12:40
Tiergarten

11:50

Extending Programming Languages with Persistent Memory Semantics - Piotr Balcer, Intel
The bulk of the Unix toolchain and related programming languages were created in the seventies and to this day programmers around the world use the same old POSIX standard, the C programming language and Unix-compatible operating systems (like Linux or OS X). The emerging non-volatile memory is a paradigm shifting technology that is poised to disrupt the current status quo. In this talk Piotr Balcer will present the state of the art research related to persistent memory language extensions and discuss the NVML (Non-Volatile Memory Library) team open source work around enabling existing languages to understand persistence.

Speakers
avatar for Piotr Balcer

Piotr Balcer

Software Engineer, Intel
Piotr Balcer is a software engineer with 4 years’ of experience working on storage related technologies at Intel Corporation. He received B.Eng. from the Gdansk University of Technology in 2014 where he studied system software engineering. For two years now he has been working on... Read More →


Thursday October 6, 2016 11:50 - 12:40
Potsdam III

11:50

What Kind of Crazy Person Uses a Full Linux Distro for IOT? - Jim Perrin, CentOS
IoT is quickly becoming omnipresent in our day to day lives, but many times we
find that platforms are obsolete as soon as they hit the market, or at the very
least get little to no security or feature updates. By adapting existing Linux
distribution development practices, IoT can both improve its security, and
expand its lifecycle with minimal overhead while adding features and extending
devices lifecycles. In this talk Peter Robinson of Fedora and Jim Perrin of
CentOS will outline a 'gold standard' workflow for IoT and maker hardware,
from getting hardware support into the distro, to the lifecycle of the
applications living on the appliance without endusers ending up with an
expensive doorstop.

Speakers
avatar for Jim Perrin

Jim Perrin

Program Manager, Microsoft
Jim has been a member of the CentOS project for over a decade, and is the maintainer of the AArch64 port of the CentOS Linux distribution.


Thursday October 6, 2016 11:50 - 12:40
Köpenick
  • Experience Level Any

11:50

Gender-Diversity Analysis of Technical Contributions to the Linux Kernel - Daniel Izquierdo, Bitergia
Women are half of the population in the world, but they are still under represented in the tech world industry nowadays. While there are clear actions in favor of attracting more female developers in order to bring more diversity to the project, the Linux Kernel shows a similar trend with this respect with low numbers.

This talk will focus on the contributions made by women to the Linux Kernel since the beginning (when possible!). This talk is specifically focused on technical contributions such as the code development activity and the code review process. It is intended to be a quantitative analysis plus specific manual polishing process to help in the accuracy of the data.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Izquierdo

Daniel Izquierdo

Director of Consulting, Bitergia
Daniel Izquierdo Cortazar is a researcher and one of the founders of Bitergia, a company that provides software analytics for open source ecosystems. Currently the chief data officer at Bitergia, he is focused on the quality of the data, research of new metrics, analysis, and studies... Read More →


Thursday October 6, 2016 11:50 - 12:40
Charlottenburg III

16:00

Adding CPU Frequency Scaling for Your ARM Platform to Linux Kernel - Bartlomiej Zolnierkiewicz, Samsung Electronics Polska Sp. z o.o.
CPU frequency scaling is one of standard features implemented when adding new ARM platform support to Linux kernel. Most (if not all) recent ARM platforms are making use of the generic Device Tree based CPUfreq driver (cpufreq-dt). During This tutorial Bartlomiej will present the inner workings of the cpufreq-dt driver and will show all the steps (including mandatory Device Tree changes and optional clocks subsystem adjustments) needed to make the driver work on new ARM platform. Off-the-shelf Hardkernel's ODROID-XU3 board (which is Samsung Exynos5422 SoC based) will be used as the example hardware for showing the step-by-step implementation of CPU frequency scaling. The tutorial will end with discussion of advanced topics like how to enable software boost functionality, when to use generic ARM big.LITTLE CPUfreq driver and when there is a need to develop a new CPUfreq driver.

Speakers
avatar for Bartlomiej Zolnierkiewicz

Bartlomiej Zolnierkiewicz

Senior Software Engineer, Samsung Electronics Polska Sp. z o.o.
Bartlomiej is a Senior Software Engineer at Samsung R&D Institute Poland. Currently, he is improving Linux Kernel support for Samsung ARM Exynos SoCs series. Zolnierkiewicz has been contributing into the Linux Kernel since 2002, working mostly on various device drivers. He was the... Read More →


Thursday October 6, 2016 16:00 - 16:50
Köpenick

16:00

Bringing Android Explicit Fencing to Mainline: A New Era for Graphics - Gustavo Padovan, Collabora Ltd.
The talk will cover the current state of Explicit Fencing on Graphics. It first appeared on Linux as the Android Sync Framework to improve buffer handling between Kernel Drivers and the HWComposer. With explicit fencing userspace is responsible for synchronize between drivers sharing the same DMA buffer. It gets the buffers' fence from the Producer driver(GPU or Camera) and send it to the Consumer one (DRM) and vice-versa. The Consumer then wait the fence to signal before using the buffer. The fence signal when the buffer is ready for use, eg: When the GPU finishes processing it., the fence signal and the DRM driver can show it on screen.

Before only Implicit Fencing existed, where the kernel handles fencing between drivers internally with no userspace interference. There was no generic code, as each driver hacked its own implicit fencing mechanism, leading to hard to debug bugs.

Speakers
avatar for Gustavo Padovan

Gustavo Padovan

Software Engineer, Collabora
Gustavo Padovan holds a BSc. Computer Science from the University of Campinas, Brazil. He is Linux Kernel Developer and works at the open-source consultancy Collabora Ltd. In the Kernel he has worked in a number of areas, notably as Maintainer of the Bluetooth Subsystem and has been... Read More →


Thursday October 6, 2016 16:00 - 16:50
Charlottenburg III

16:00

Persistent Memory Extensions to libstdc++/libc++ - Tomasz Kapela, Intel
In the advent of a new, persistent memory enabled world, the current software
industry must prepare for the upcoming changes. Looking forward to meet those
new requirements set by the new type of hardware, a new standard API should be
introduced to ease the adoption of this new technology. During the development
of the Linux NVM (Non Volatile Memory) Library, it became apparent, that the C
API is complex and hard to use. To remove some of the pain points, a proposal
of a new C++ API was made. This presentation/talk will explain the design
process and decisions made during the implementation phase, as well as the
interaction with the existing implementations of the C++ standard library.

Speakers
avatar for Tomasz Kapela

Tomasz Kapela

Software Engineer, Intel
Tomasz Kapela is a software engineer with 6 years of experience in the industry. He majored in radio communication systems from the Gdansk University of Technology in 2010. Since then he worked as a software developer and systems designer in Radmor, where he designed and implemented... Read More →


Thursday October 6, 2016 16:00 - 16:50
Potsdam I/II

16:00

Lessons from Database Failures - Colin Charles, Percona
Lets learn from MySQL failures at scale, because we tie in the topic of High Availability, in where people are thinking about geographical redundancy, and even things like automatic failover. In the talk there will be case study material, e.g. where automatic failure caused Github to go offline, where Facebook doesn’t use fully automated failover but assisted failover, etc. How is the MySQL world making things better, for example by allowing you to use semi-synchronous replication to run fully scalable services. The talk starts off with an even almost stupid example of how a business died due to incorrect MySQL backup procedures. It will go on to talk about security and encryption at rest as well. So a mix of problems from the field, big “fail whales”, and how you should avoid them by properly architecting solutions

Speakers
avatar for Colin Charles

Colin Charles

principal consultant, grok
Colin Charles is the Managing Consultant at GrokOpen. Previously, Colin was on the founding team of MariaDB Server, worked at MySQL and Percona, and worked actively on the Fedora and OpenOffice.org projects. Colin has been a MySQL user since 2000. He’s well known within open source communities, enjoys building business and market entry in APAC and has spoken at many conferences... Read More →


Thursday October 6, 2016 16:00 - 16:50
Hugos South

16:00

The Set of Programmers: How Math Restricts Us - Carol Smith, Github
This presentation will open a discussion about how we are introducing new developers to programming. Most textbooks, tutorials, and trainings begin by introducing new developers to mathematics lessons within the language. Many courses on programming require math skills as prerequisites. However, math prowess is not usually an indicator of one's potential programming abilities. Those people who have been told from a young age that they aren't good at math or generally doubt their math skills often feel excluded from the world of programming unnecessarily.

Speakers
CS

Carol Smith

Education Partnership Manager, Github
Carol Smith is an Education Partnership Program Manager at GitHub. Before GitHub, she managed the Google Summer of Code program for 6 years and worked at Google for over 10 years. She has a degree in Journalism from California State University, Northridge, and is a cook, cyclist... Read More →


Thursday October 6, 2016 16:00 - 16:50
Potsdam III
  • Experience Level Any

17:00

How Linux Keeps Mission Critical Application Up 24x7 - Linda Wang, Red Hat
"Zero Down Time! " That is what most of the operating systems claimed to provide; but do they really have what it takes to keep enterprise mission critical applications up and running 24x7 for years on end; without replacing broken hardware or avoid security fixes? To accomplish such objective, it will take more than just one or two features here and there, but a suite of enterprise ready services and capabilities to help accomplish such undertaking. This presentation will walk through various capabilities that Linux operating system provides to help keep an enterprise production system up and running.

Speakers
LW

Linda Wang

Director, SW Engineering, Core Kernel, Red Hat, Inc.
Linda Wang is Director of Software Engineering in Red Hat Enterprise Linux Business Unit at Red Hat, Inc. Her group focus on the Core Kernel technologies such as memory management, scheduler, control group and namespaces. The open source projects that her team involved in are Live... Read More →


Thursday October 6, 2016 17:00 - 17:50
Hugos South

17:00

Using Static Checkers to Find C Language Security Vulnerabilities in the Linux Kernel - Vaishali Thakkar, Linux Foundation
Static code analysis is commonly understood to be an automatic check of source code by a tool. Hundreds of possible fault types have been identified in C code, such as uninitialized variables, buffer overflows, race conditions etc over the years. Since a major part of the Linux kernel is written in C, there is clearly a need for automatic checking for compliance with proper security-related idioms.

The talk will depict the most common security-related coding errors that can arise in the Linux kernel and how current static checkers are helping in finding/fixing them. The talk will give an overview of the available and most commonly used tools, including sparse, coccinelle, smatch, checkpatch, clang, coverity etc. It will also highlight the kind of security vulnerabilities each of these tools is best adapted to handle.

Speakers
avatar for Vaishali Thakkar

Vaishali Thakkar

Linux kernel engineer, Freelancer
Vaishali Thakkar is a freelance kernel engineer and co-organizer of RGSoC. She has diverse interest in different areas/subsystems of Linux Kernel, including but not limited to I2C, Security, memory management. power management etc. She also volunteers as a coordinator for Linux Kernel... Read More →


Thursday October 6, 2016 17:00 - 17:50
Charlottenburg III
  • Experience Level Any

17:00

Using the Valgrind Framework to Build a Persistent Memory Error Detector - Krzysztof Czurylo & Tomasz Kapela, Intel
Valgrind is a popular, multi-platform instrumentation framework for building dynamic binary analysis tools. In the Linux community, it is mostly known and valued for a few popular tools: Memcheck - a memory-management error detector, and Helgrind/DRD - two threading bugs detectors.
In this talk, we will present a new tool built on Valgrind - Pmemcheck - yet another memory error detector designed specifically to detect problems with Persistent Memory programming.
First, we will talk about the motivation for creating new error detector and the reasons for which we have chosen Valgrind framework to create Pmemecheck. We will also shed some light on typical issues related to the use of byte-addressable persistent memory. Finally, we will present an in-depth view on the Pmemcheck design and the changes we have made to the core part of Valgrind to support persistent memory.

Speakers
KC

Krzysztof Czuryło

Senior Software Engineer, Intel
Krzysztof Czuryło is a Software Architect at Intel, having over 15 years of experience in databases, networking/telecommunication and 3D graphics. For the last three years he is mostly focused on persistent memory programming and algorithms providing effective and fail-safe usage... Read More →
avatar for Tomasz Kapela

Tomasz Kapela

Software Engineer, Intel
Tomasz Kapela is a software engineer with 6 years of experience in the industry. He majored in radio communication systems from the Gdansk University of Technology in 2010. Since then he worked as a software developer and systems designer in Radmor, where he designed and implemented... Read More →


Thursday October 6, 2016 17:00 - 17:50
Potsdam I/II

17:00

Boosting Enterprise Transaction Processing Using Hardware Acceleration - Muhammad Usman Karim Khan, IBM
Owing to the conceivable future of a large number of internet-connected and security-enabled devices (e.g., in the IoT paradigm), the content-providing servers must deliver; (a) high availability, (b) high throughput and (c) high level of security. This talk focuses on how hardware accelerators can help to meet these requirements, specifically on the IBM’s LinuxONE systems. We investigate the impact of hardware-assisted encryption and compression functions. We present deployment recommendation and advantages of using hardware acceleration for end-to-end transaction processing employed by typical web- and application-servers, and different databases. Competitive results show that leveraging the hardware accelerators provide higher throughput when compared to the x86 platform and alternative deployment schemes.

Speakers
MU

Muhammad Usman Karim Khan

Software Performance Analyst, International Business Machines (IBM)
Mr. M. Usman K. Khan received his Master’s degree in Electrical Engineering and Ph.D. in Computer Science from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany). During the course of his Ph.D., he was actively involved in R&D, and co-optimization and co-designing the software and hardware... Read More →


Thursday October 6, 2016 17:00 - 17:50
Köpenick
  • Experience Level Any

17:00

Handle Conflict, Like a Boss! - Deb Nicholson, Open Invention Network
Conflict sucks! The open source community is full of passionate people with many, many differing ideas on how to achieve our shared goals. Disagreements seem inevitable, but what if they could be handled rationally, in a way that left everyone feeling at least OK about the outcome? It's possible. You can learn to cut to the heart of the disagreement, mediate and move forward. Many of us avoid dealing with tricky situations or let conflict avoidance keep us from accomplishing amazing things together. Conflict can be handled -- without flamethrowers -- and the process will often make your community stronger. It just takes time, a slightly relaxed ego and a willingness to see the best outcome for the most people. This talk covers when to handle conflict, strategies for both one-on-one situations and group situations and tips on how to scale your conflict resolution skills, like a boss.

Speakers
avatar for Deb Nicholson

Deb Nicholson

Director of Community Outreach, Open Invention Network
Deb Nicholson is a free software policy expert and a passionate community advocate. She is the Community Outreach Director for the Open Invention Network, the world's largest patent non-aggression community which serves Linux, GNU, Android and other key FOSS projects. She’s won... Read More →


Thursday October 6, 2016 17:00 - 17:50
Potsdam III
  • Experience Level Any

17:00

Why Moja Global? - Guy Janssen, Moja Global
moja global is a Linux Foundation project that develops and manages software for estimating greenhouse gas emissions from the land sector. Models are used to simulate changes in emissions across all lands, including forests, crops and grasslands. The models are controlled by generic data processing software and can be configured to meet countries specific needs.

moja global provides a generic framework that integrates remote-sensing and ground data to allow countries to estimate their emissions in the land sector. moja global provides for a variety of country-specific configurations and other tools to support inventory development. The software does not rely on any specific remote sensing sensor or method. As the system is customisable, countries are able to use the moja global tool to compare different scenarios for their land-use emissions-transforming a country’s national accounts into a tool that supports policy making and scenario planning.

Speakers
avatar for Guy Janssen

Guy Janssen

Interim Director, moja global
Climate Change. Governance. The world in 2026


Thursday October 6, 2016 17:00 - 17:50
Tiergarten